• An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
Safety on the Line

Electrical utility work is vital to everyday life. It may not get a lot of attention until there is a power outage, but it is a prevalent part of our home, school, work, economic, and leisure activities. Those in the industry know the importance of electrical and workplace safety. Many work very closely with electricity—putting their lives on the line.

Accidents unfortunately do occur, and they can have deadly and tragic consequences that extend far beyond the job site. A climate of safety must be created in the workplace in order to help prevent such accidents. Increasing electrical safety awareness and knowledge are critical steps, but technical information alone is often too faceless and distant to affect attitudes toward safety. One’s mindset is a big part of being safe on the job. Even if you’ve been doing the work for years, getting reinvigorated about safety helps keep life-saving mindsets, procedures, and technologies in the forefront—giving them the importance they are due.

The Energy Education Council and its Safe Electricity program want to help ensure that everyone comes home safe every night. Our utility members have access to attention-getting and award-winning materials for internal safety as part of their Safety on the Line series. Safety on the Line resources help utility workers keep safety in focus with videos that feature real people and real electrical accidents, attention-getting posters, messages, and discussion guides. Each year, a different personal story is highlighted. They provide a great way to learn from actual experiences and to strengthen outlooks on safety. The series has included:

Bruce Stumpe
  • One Line, One Time (2014): Bruce Stumpe shares his personal experience with an electrical accident on the job as a member of the relay crew and emphasizes the importance of safety and how one missed step can change your life forever. Bruce says, “If you think it can’t happen to you, you’re missing something because I was the guy that said, ‘That can’t happen to me.’”
Gary Norland
  • The original Safety on the Line video (2013): Gary Norland, a former lineman, came into contact with 12,500 volts while on the job. He suffered life-changing burns and injuries that continue to affect him, 20 years later. Gary advises, “Take the time and do it right the first time. Make sure you do everything safe.”
The climate of safety extends beyond the workplace as well to all those served. EEC – Safe Electricity provides utility members numerous safety education resources for consumers—from indoor electrical safety to outdoor project safety to tree planting to water recreation safety. Learn more about becoming a member.

The payoff in safety is always worth the time invested. Staying safe is a continual process—because it only takes one distracted, unsafe second to lose your life.

 

Love the work.

Respect the work.

Internal Safety

 


 

Search Content