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Plant Trees Out of Harm’s Way | Print |  Email

Plant Trees Out of Harm’s Way

Autumn is a great time to plant trees and shrubs. Cool temperatures make it easier to work outside, and adequate moisture ensures that trees will survive through the winter. Safety should also be a consideration in tree-planting, and Safe Electricity has tips to make sure your trees are out of harm ways.Trees

Large trees near power lines are a safety hazard. They can cause fires, electric shocks, and power outages. If you have a tree near a power line, children should not climb, and you should not attempt to trim it. Only tree trimming professionals, or utility workers should trim trees near power lines.

You can avoid this stress by planting the right tree in the right place. Ground hugging shrubs and small trees that reach no more than 15 feet in height can be planted near overhead lines. Trees that mature within a 25 to 45 foot height should be planted no closer than 35 feet from the power line. Trees that exceed 45 feet in height should be planted no closer than 45 feet from the line.

In addition to overhead lines, buried power lines can also be a problem for trees and vice versa.  If utility crews need access to the buried cable, the root system may suffer.  Trees and shrubs should not be planted deliberately over an underground utility line.

Not only do trees add to the beauty of your landscape, they also help the environment by absorbing carbon dioxide and can also help improve energy efficiency.  Shade from trees can reduce the air temperature around your home. Trees can also break cold winter winds. Plant the right tree in the right place and visualize it when it is fully grown.  While fast growing trees will reach a mature height sooner, their wood is softer and they are more susceptible to losing limbs in winds and ice storms.