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Electrical safety when working outside | Print |  Email

Electric Safety When Working Outside

As spring returns and melts ice and snow, many homeowners return to outdoor chores. Before you work outside, Safe Electricity reminds you to keep electrical safety in mind.

Winter storms may have damaged storms, and you may want to trim and beautify these trees. However, if these trees are near power lines, leave trimming to professionals. If you try and do the job yourself, you orOutdoor electrical safetyyour tools may come in contact with power lines.

If you plan on working with a ladder, remember to stay far from power lines. If it is damp or windy, save outdoor chores for another day. Water conducts electricity, and wind could blow a ladder out of control and into a power line.

As you head outdoors, look up and check to see how close your work may take you to overhead power lines and avoid contact with them.  If you see a problem, alert your utility.

Planning to use some power tools in your efforts?  Make sure you won’t be standing in puddles or wet areas when you use them— wait for those areas to dry out.

Always check the condition of cords before plugging in electric tools, and use a portable ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) if you outdoor outlets don’t have GFCI protection. GFCIs monitor the flow of electricity, and can detect situation where an electric shock is likely. They shut off power to electronics before a shock happens.

Work safely as you work outdoors!

 


 

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